Indiana House Rabbit Societywavewaverabbit
left border

Checklist of Supplies for your Pet Rabbit

Item

Description


Cage Tall enough for your rabbit to stretch up without his ears touching the top. Long/wide enough that your rabbit can stretch out fully in any direction with some room to spare. A door that opens outward so that the rabbit can hop in and out of his cage on his own. Roomy enough to have space for a litterbox, a food dish and water supply. The larger the better, especially if your rabbit will spend many hours a day in his cage.

Suggested Products

More housing ideas


Resting surface Your rabbit's cage should include a solid surface for resting. If the cage you have has an all-wire bottom, you can provide a solid surface by inserting a carpet sample, folded newspaper, cardboard, etc.

Litterboxes Have at least two - one for inside the cage; the other for the exercise area. They should be big enough for your rabbit and a portion of hay to be in the box together comfortably. A deep (4"+) or high sided litterbox is recommended to prevent accidents.

Note: Make sure litterbox fits through the cage door!

Retailers


Food Dish Preferably a heavy, ceramic crock or plastic dish that can be secured to the cage. If you have a pair of rabbits, be sure to get a bowl large enough so both rabbits can fit their heads in at the same time, or two bowls, to prevent disagreements.

Retailers


Water supply Either a bottle or a dish similar to food dish. Most rabbits require at least a 16 oz. bottle and bigger is usually better.

Retailers


Carrier Used to safely transport your rabbit home, to/from the vet and to evacuate in case of emergency. Look for a carrier that disassembles easily and/or has a top opening in order to remove an unwilling rabbit with the least trauma.

Retailers


Care Book Packed with information about how to care for your new rabbit, the House Rabbit Handbook by Marinell Harriman is a great resource to have on hand to better understand the needs of your new pet rabbit.

Buy the House Rabbit Handbook from amazon.com


Nail Trimmers For most rabbits, scissor style is easiest to use. For dwarf rabbits, you can use human nail trimmers.

Retailers


Grass Hay Need to maintain a continuous supply, so your rabbit has hay at all times. Use any grass hay, such as Timothy, Orchard, Brome, Oat or mixed grasses. Avoid alfalfa except as an occasional treat.

Suggested Products

Retailers


Food Pellets A plain pellet (without mixed in additions) that is also:
High in fiber (>18%) Low in calcium (<0.9%)
Low in protein (<14%) Low in fat (<2%)

Suggested Products

Retailers

More about food


Toys Chew toys, toss toys, noisemakers and hiding spaces. The more toys your rabbit has, the less likely he is to use his natural instinct to dig/chew on inappropriate items like furniture. However, toys are not an alternative to bunny-proofing for your rabbit's safety.

Retailers

More about toys


Litter Preferably an organic or paper-based litter. Avoid clumping litter and soft-wood shavings (cedar/pine) that can cause serious health problems. If your rabbit decides to eat his litter, then additional precautions are necessary to prevent digestive problems. Ask your House Rabbit Society Educator for details!

Suggested Products

Retailers

More about litter


Fresh greens & veggies Leafy greens: Romaine, kale, collard greens, beet tops, mustard greens, carrot tops
Herbs: mint, parsley, cilantro, basil, sorrel, etc.
Veggies: carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, etc.
NEVER feed: corn, peas, beans, potatoes, rhubarb greens, onions or garlic

More about greens





right border
Indiana House Rabbit Society